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2019-07-22 09:25:43

10 things in tech you need to know today

Elon Musk's Hyperloop hit a new top speed, he tweeted.Mike Blake/Reuters

Good morning! This is the tech news you need to know this Monday.

Google is paying out $11 million to settle an age-discrimination case from 2015, Bloomberg reports. The class action case comprises of 227 people, meaning an average payout of $35,000 each.A New York Times reporter went undercover as a deliveryman for Uber Eats and Doordash to see what it's like to work for food delivery apps. He found a large proportion of his deliveries didn't come with a tip.Elon Musk tweeted that his tunnel transportation system Hyperloop hit a new top speed of 288 mph. Musk also tweeted that next year's Hyperloop engineering competition, run by his company SpaceX, will be in a 10km vacuum tunnel with a curve. Netflix was threatened with legal action over its Cambridge Analytica documentary The Great Hack, the Guardian reports. The lawyers Arron Banks, the businessman behind Leave.EU which had ties to Cambridge Analytica, wrote to Netflix with concerns about false and defamatory allegations in the film.The FTC has finalised a settlement with Google over failing to protect children on its platform and improperly collecting their data, the Washington Post reports. Google is expected to pay a multimillion dollar fine, sources told the Post.Google honored Apollo 11 software developer Margaret Hamilton with a 1.4-square-mile portrait using moonlight and more than 100,000 mirrors. Hamilton, 82, was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Barack Obama in 2016.Police in Florida have ditched Amazon's facial recognition technology because of glitches and resourcing issues. The technology, called Rekognition, is designed to use facial recognition algorithms to find and track suspects in real-time.A new app called Who's in Town lets people's Instagram followers track their location, Wired reports. The app was created to show how much of our data is hoovered up by apps like Instagram.A YouTube executive denied to the BBC that the platform sends users down a rabbithole. YouTube's managing director for the UK Ben McOwen Wilson was responding to a BBC investigation into how YouTube helped propagate flat-Earth theories.Images of the new Pixel 4 from Google appear to show a large bezel running across the top of the device to carry an array of sensors. Google showed images of the back of the phone in June, after earlier leaks, but didn't show the front of the device.

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10 things in tech you need to know today10 things in tech you need to know today

Good morning! This is the tech news you need to...

10 things in tech you need to know today

10 things in tech,10 things in tech SAI

10 things in tech you need to know today

2019-07-22T09:05:08+02:00

2019-07-22T08:24:36+02:00

2019-07-22T09:05:33+02:00

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BusinessInsiderDe

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Good morning! This is the tech news you need to know this Monday. Google is paying out $11 million to settle an age-discrimination case from 2015, Bloomberg reports. The class action case comprises of 227 people, meaning an average payout of $35,000 each. A New York Times reporter went undercover as a deliveryman for Uber Eats and Doordash to see what it's like to work for food delivery apps. He found a large proportion of his deliveries didn't come with a tip. Elon Musk tweeted that his tunnel transportation system Hyperloop hit a new top speed of 288 mph. Musk also tweeted that next year's Hyperloop engineering competition, run by his company SpaceX, will be in a 10km vacuum tunnel with a curve. Netflix was threatened with legal action over its Cambridge Analytica documentary The Great Hack, the Guardian reports. The lawyers Arron Banks, the businessman behind Leave.EU which had ties to Cambridge Analytica, wrote to Netflix with concerns about false and defamatory allegations in the film. The FTC has finalised a settlement with Google over failing to protect children on its platform and improperly collecting their data, the Washington Post reports. Google is expected to pay a multimillion dollar fine, sources told the Post. Google honored Apollo 11 software developer Margaret Hamilton with a 1.4-square-mile portrait using moonlight and more than 100,000 mirrors. Hamilton, 82, was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Barack Obama in 2016. Police in Florida have ditched Amazon's facial recognition technology because of glitches and resourcing issues. The technology, called Rekognition, is designed to use facial recognition algorithms to find and track suspects in real-time. A new app called Who's in Town lets people's Instagram followers track their location, Wired reports. The app was created to show how much of our data is hoovered up by apps like Instagram. A YouTube executive denied to the BBC that the platform sends users down a rabbithole. YouTube's managing director for the UK Ben McOwen Wilson was responding to a BBC investigation into how YouTube helped propagate flat-Earth theories. Images of the new Pixel 4 from Google appear to show a large bezel running across the top of the device to carry an array of sensors. Google showed images of the back of the phone in June, after earlier leaks, but didn't show the front of the device. Have an Amazon Alexa device? Now you can hear 10 Things in Tech each morning. Just search for Business Insider in your Alexa's flash briefing settings. You can also subscribe to this newsletter here — just tick 10 Things in Tech You Need to Know.

international

10 things in tech you need to know today10 things in tech you need to know today

Good morning! This is the tech news you need to...

10 things in tech you need to know today

10 things in tech,10 things in tech SAI

10 things in tech you need to know today

2019-07-22T09:05:08+02:00

2019-07-22T09:05:33+02:00

https://static6.businessinsider.de/image/5ca50d83d2ce7821606590e5-500-250/10-things-in-tech-you-need-to-know-today.jpg

BusinessInsiderDe

https://www.businessinsider.de/assets/images/logos/og-image-logo.png

Good morning! This is the tech news you need to know this Monday. Google is paying out $11 million to settle an age-discrimination case from 2015, Bloomberg reports. The class action case comprises of 227 people, meaning an average payout of $35,000 each. A New York Times reporter went undercover as a deliveryman for Uber Eats and Doordash to see what it's like to work for food delivery apps. He found a large proportion of his deliveries didn't come with a tip. Elon Musk tweeted that his tunnel transportation system Hyperloop hit a new top speed of 288 mph. Musk also tweeted that next year's Hyperloop engineering competition, run by his company SpaceX, will be in a 10km vacuum tunnel with a curve. Netflix was threatened with legal action over its Cambridge Analytica documentary The Great Hack, the Guardian reports. The lawyers Arron Banks, the businessman behind Leave.EU which had ties to Cambridge Analytica, wrote to Netflix with concerns about false and defamatory allegations in the film. The FTC has finalised a settlement with Google over failing to protect children on its platform and improperly collecting their data, the Washington Post reports. Google is expected to pay a multimillion dollar fine, sources told the Post. Google honored Apollo 11 software developer Margaret Hamilton with a 1.4-square-mile portrait using moonlight and more than 100,000 mirrors. Hamilton, 82, was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Barack Obama in 2016. Police in Florida have ditched Amazon's facial recognition technology because of glitches and resourcing issues. The technology, called Rekognition, is designed to use facial recognition algorithms to find and track suspects in real-time. A new app called Who's in Town lets people's Instagram followers track their location, Wired reports. The app was created to show how much of our data is hoovered up by apps like Instagram. A YouTube executive denied to the BBC that the platform sends users down a rabbithole. YouTube's managing director for the UK Ben McOwen Wilson was responding to a BBC investigation into how YouTube helped propagate flat-Earth theories. Images of the new Pixel 4 from Google appear to show a large bezel running across the top of the device to carry an array of sensors. Google showed images of the back of the phone in June, after earlier leaks, but didn't show the front of the device. Have an Amazon Alexa device? Now you can hear 10 Things in Tech each morning. Just search for Business Insider in your Alexa's flash briefing settings. You can also subscribe to this newsletter here — just tick 10 Things in Tech You Need to Know.

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